20 Questions: Wesley Thompson, Charlotte

by David Stout  Associate Editor  editor2@goqnotes.com
Published: September 29, 2012 in 20 Questions

Wesley Thompson dreamed of growing up and practicing medicine. That is, when he wasn’t dreaming of growing up and becoming Darrin Stephens and marrying a martini-making enchantress. “Once I realized I couldn’t have a witch for a wife,” he says, “guys were my next option!” After securing a degree from Duke University, he began working as a physician assistant in the late ’80s and, owing to the times and the fact that he was openly gay, patients with HIV soon found their way to him at Kaiser Permanente in Raleigh. He had discovered his passion.

Wesley came to Charlotte in 1997. Today, he enjoys a full life in the Queen City with Trey, his hubby of 26 years, and their two dogs Kitsey and Abbey. He practices HIV/AIDS and general medicine for the LGBT community at Rosedale Infectious Diseases in Huntersville. 20 Qs wanted to know more about this Flo Nightingale, so — us being us — we got all up in the Kool-Aid.

What is your all-time favorite medical show?

Life in my clinic is way more interesting than medical shows on TV, but if I had to choose it would probably be “M*A*S*H.”

Have you ever purchased a condom from a restroom vending machine?

Er, yes. My very first and I proudly carried it in my wallet for a year. And, then I turned 13.

Is there a lawn or garden chore that you actually enjoy?

That depends on whether watching the yard guy is considered a chore.

What kind of animal best reflects your personality?

Bugs Bunny.

How do these films rank based on the number of times you’ve seen them: “Blade Runner,” “The Fugitive,” “Raiders Of The Lost Ark,” “Witness”?

In order, “Raiders Of The Lost Ark,” “Blade Runner,” “The Fugitive” and then “Witness.” Anything with Harrison Ford is right up there for me — even “Cowboys & Aliens” (which has Daniel Craig too).

Did you own a G.I. Joe doll when you were young?

I did not, but now I have a G.I. Joe and a G.I. male nurse sitting together holding hands on my bookshelf in the office. Did I mention that I have a thing for men in uniform?

If Peppermint Patty and Marcie ever split up — goddess forbid — who would be a good match for each?

Patty and Marcie are sacrosanct! How could you even ask me that?

How would you finish this sentence: “It’s 11 o’clock on a Saturday night, time for me to…”

“…Let the dogs out to do their business.” (I know, sad isn’t it?)

What’s a perfect first name for a man who’s both super hot and super brainy?

Daddy!

Do you know how to water ski?

Yes, I have slalom skied since I was 15. Now, I’m trying to learn wakeboarding.

Are you more of a dreamer or more of a realist?

I believe if you can dream it you can become it. That’s my reality.

Who’s the sexiest “Jason” of all time?

Jason Statham would be up there for sexy good guy, Jason Segal for sexy sweet doofus and Jason Varitek of the Boston Red Sox for general sexy woofiness. (Did I mention that I have a thing for men in uniform?)

How long has it been since you’ve taken a bubble bath?

A year after my better half Trey’s stem cell transplant, we took our first bath together in more than 20 years

Pancake, cupcake or beefcake?

Beefcake serving me pancakes…in Daisy Dukes no less!

Can you recall your childhood home phone number?

Yes, I’m good with numbers and I definitely can.

How many albums do you own by Led Zeppelin, Stevie Wonder and Cyndi Lauper added together?

Only one: Cyndi Lauper’s 1983 debut album “She’s So Unusual” — on vinyl.

Which sport displays its participants in the best uniforms or outfits?

I had a thing for baseball players until I found out they were wearing protective cups.

Do you more often prefer to have your feet bare or covered at home?

Bare. I love to have my feet rubbed! Is that an offer?

What’s your go-to word or phrase for when you’re feeling angry, frustrated or annoyed?

I don’t think it’s printable.

Do you think we will have an effective HIV vaccine within the next decade?

I think research is working very hard to figure out a vaccine. HIV piggybacks on our own DNA and tricks us into making more of it — the sneaky little bugger. This makes it hard to configure a vaccine. A functional cure is most likely in the next decade. In the meanwhile, research is ongoing looking at multiple one-pill-a-day regimens and an every-three-months injection for controlling HIV. Also, Truvada, when combined with other preventive measures, is very promising for decreasing the number of new cases and was a “Turning The Tide” theme at this year’s International AIDS Conference. : :