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Antiques and Collectibles: Flea Markets and Fairs not to be missed

by Jesi Harris . Q-Notes staff

If you’re looking for antiques and one-of-a-kind collectibles, check out this list of special events in the Carolinas.
Like artifacts from our ancient ancestors, antiques from the not-so-distant past seem to fascinate and intrigue many who spend their lifetimes collecting and researching them. A quality piece of antique furniture or vintage artifact could be worth anything from two to seven figures or more if well preserved.

For collectors looking for unique and one-of-a-kind items, the following shows are known for being among the best opportunities in the region. Happy shopping!

Beaufort, S.C.
Jumble Sale: The Beaufort Historical Site turns into a community market with art, handmade crafts, holiday gifts, pre-loved treasures, antiques, clothing, food and much more. No admission fee. Vendor information is available. Nov. 17, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
www.beauforthistoricsite.org

Cameron, N.C.
Thirteen antique shops and 350 outside dealers participate in this anticipated collection of antique items in Cameron’s historic district. Food, refreshments, and parking are available. Oct. 7. 910-245-3055.

Charlotte, N.C.
Charlotte Antique & Collectibles Show: Monthly, the Metrolina Expo building holds one of the largest, most famous antique shows in the Carolinas. Featuring an outdoor shopping area and over 500 vendors selling furniture, statuettes and rare items from the past, dealers and buyers alike congregate in hopes of discovering the pieces they’ve been searching for among this massive collection of antiques. Aug. 2-5, Aug. 30-Sept. 2, Oct. 4-7, Oct. 31-Nov. 4*. Thursday: Early Buyers/Dealer Set-up Day 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $10 four-day pass, $5 One Day Pass.
www.dmgantiqueshows.com/metrolina

*This five-day show, called the Antiques Spectacular, hosts over 1,500 antiques dealers from around the world with a wide array of collectible items. Many dealers save their best items for this particular show, which occurs only twice a year. $30 5-day pass, $12 4-day pass, $7 Fri.-Sat. pass, $3 Sunday pass.

Charlotte Collectibles Show: Collectors of sports cards, NASCAR memorabilia, toys and hobby gear will revel in the presentation at Metrolina Expo Center’s Collectibles Show. Oct. 27 and 28 will find 275 tables of merchandise and hundreds more aficionados enjoying the rarest items Charlotte has to offer. $5 daily, $7 weekend pass, 15 and under get in free. October 27-28. Saturday 9 a.m.-4 pm, Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. www.insidepitch.com

Greensboro, N.C.
Greensboro Collectibles Show: Toys, hobbies and sports cards on 400 tables of display, Nov. 17 and 18. There are rare collectibles waiting to be discovered for only $6 a day. $9 weekend pass (plus $3 parking), 15 and under get in free. Saturday 9 a.m.-4 a.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-4 a.m. Greensboro Coliseum Complex. www.insidepitch.com

Super Flea Market: Owned and operated by the Greensboro Coliseum Complex, the Super Flea Market has established itself as the North Carolina Piedmont’s premiere variety show. The market boasts a superior group of hundreds of dealers from throughout the Southeast, many of whom have been with the show since its inception. As a true variety show, the Super Flea Market abounds with new and used merchandise, collectibles, antiques, crafts, vintage, costume, antique and new jewelry, home décor and furniture. Super Flea Market is a one-of-a-kind shopping experience. Aug. 11-12, Oct. 6-7, Nov. 2-4, Dec. 1-2. Saturdays 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m.-4 a.m. Free admission. Greensboro Coliseum Pavilion. www.superfela.com

Greenville, S.C.
Annual Antiques Show: The Greenville County Museum of Art will host the 22nd annual antique show to help fund the purchase of their permanent collection. In the past, the show has drawn both serious and neophyte collectors from around the Southeast with antique furniture, rugs, silver, paintings, porcelain, folk art and many other treasures. Lecture by Frances Schultz, an internationally-known speaker and author whose books include “A House in the South” and “Signature Weddings.” $5 in advance, $8 at the door. Oct. 12-14. Friday and Saturday 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday 1-5 p.m. www.antiques.greenvillemuseum.org

Antiques Extravaganza: The semiannual antiques show, previously held in Spartanburg, is returning to its original location, Greenville’s Palmetto Expo Center. The facility will host the show and sale that has been occurring twice a year in the Greenville-Spartanburg area since 1990. Oct. 19-21. Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Palmetto Expo Center. www.antextofnc.com

Hickory, N.C.
Hickory Collectibles Show: 150 tables full of sports cards, NASCAR, toy, and hobby paraphernalia at the Hickory Metro Convention Center for only $4 admission can’t be a mistake. Search for your favorite sports and hobby memorabilia Oct. 6 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $4,15 and under get in free. Hickory Metro Convention Center. www.insidepitch.com

Liberty, N.C.
Liberty Outdoor Antiques Festival: Over 300 dealers will flock to this outdoor display of antiques anticipated by revelers of nostalgia from all over North Carolina. Sept. 28-29. John Marsh Rd. 336-622-3040

McCormick, S.C.
Appraisal Fair and Antiques & Collectibles Roadshow: Downtown, on the grounds of the historic cotton gin and gist mill, is where you will find appraisers, collectors, and sellers of antiques toting their wares for crowds of South Carolinians to see and appreciate. Appraisal tickets are sold in advance. Sept. 15.10 a.m.-5 p.m. 706-359-6061.

Raleigh, N.C.
Raleigh Collectibles Show: As a monthly tradition, Inside Pitch brings a collectibles show to Raleigh, displaying 200 tables with items like sports cards and toy/hobby paraphernalia. For $5 daily admission or a $7 weekend pass, collectors may peruse the displays most months of the year. Aug. 10-12, Sept. 15-16, Dec. 14-16. Fridays 2 p.m.-7 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 15 and under get in free. Kerr Building at NC State Fairgrounds. www.insidepitch.com

WCR Antiques Show & Sale: The Woman’s Club of Raleigh will sponsor an antiques show and sale in the Kerr Scott Building at the NC State Fairgrounds featuring old furniture and collections of home pieces and heirlooms. Nov. 16-18. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $7 for all three days. www.womansclubofraleigh.org

Selma, N.C.
East Coast Antique Show: Possibly the most popular antique show in the region, Selma’s uptown antique district expects around 8,000 enthusiasts to attend the East Coast Antique Show, an event with a history of success. Features jewelry, linens, civil war items, Depression glass, bottles, furniture and more. Sept. 21-22. Uptown Antique District. www.eastcoastantiqueshow.com

Winston-Salem, N.C.
Winston-Salem Antiques Extravaganza Show and Sale: Drawing attention throughout the state as the first antiques extravaganza (started 30 years ago). The Winston-Salem show and sale has made one of the best reputations for attracting quality antiques and sellers. For this reason, it is referred to as the granddaddy of all the antique extravaganza shows. See for yourself. Nov. 23-25. LJVM Coliseum Annex & Ed. Building. www.antextofnc.com

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