Mayfield accuses fellow gay leader of intolerance

Mayfield again refuses to condemn anti-Semitic and anti-LGBT comments by Louis Farrakhan

LaWana Mayfield

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Openly lesbian Charlotte City Councilmember LaWana Mayfield has doubled-down on her support of anti-Semitic and anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) hate group leader Louis Farrakhan following a breaking story on Friday morning detailing her attendance at a recent Farrakhan event in Charlotte at which she said he was “doing God’s will.”

In posts on Facebook (a screen capture is available below), Mayfield has now accused a fellow LGBT leader of intolerance and again declined to “pass judgement” on Farrakhan. qnotes had previously asked her to condemn Farrakhan’s history of anti-Semitic and anti-LGBT remarks.

Shane Windmeyer, founder and executive director of the Charlotte-based national group Campus Pride, responded to a posting on Mayfield’s Facebook page on Friday night in which a flier for Farrakhan’s event last week was posted. Windmeyer’s post contained several of Farrakhan’s comments on Jews and gays.

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[Ed. Note — This writer was briefly employed by Campus Pride during his hiatus from the newspaper this past spring. He is currently assisting Campus Pride with a web-based project left uncompleted when his tenure with the organization ended. He has no other official ties with the organization.]

“I support all residents in my district and with over 1,100 [Facebook] friends I am not going to always delete information that shows up on my page,” Mayfield wrote in response. “It is not my place to pass judgement on anyone that is GOD’S work.”

Windmeyer later responded with his opinion on how Farrakhan’s anti-gay religious views could harm LGBT young people.

Mayfield then accused Windmeyer of intolerance.

“Understand this, I NEVER COMPROMISE MY PRINCIPALS [sic] including when 1 group opposes another,” she wrote. “I attended a local muslim [sic] community event and they sent out a flyer. You or no-one [sic] else will have me Not represent ALL people in this community. I will no sooner remove this than I would remove a flyer you have sent, [Human Rights Campaign] flyers or the Jewish Community flyers. If you are working for FULL Equality than practice that as I do. You do not get to advocate intolerance here…. [sic]”

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In a follow-up posting, Windmeyer said he questioned Mayfield’s commitment to equality.

“For you to be so adamant in your support for Farrakhan without condemning his past actions is disturbing — at minimum,” Windmeyer wrote. “I am an advocate for full equality and I stand against bias and hate in all its forms. … I will not tolerate hate toward anyone in the name of God or any faith, especially when LGBT youth are victims of such religion-based bigotry. Yes, I therefore question your principles and will continue to do so openly — to do otherwise is contradictory to equality and justice.”

Mayfield was among several other local elected officials who attended an event on Oct. 13 at which Farrakhan was a headliner. A separate event was held the next day in which Mecklenburg County Commissioner Vilma Leake appeared on stage with Farrakhan. Mecklenburg Board of County Commissioners Chairman Harold Cogdell was also at the Oct. 13. On Friday, he, too, refused to condemn Farrakhan’s anti-Semitic and anti-LGBT remarks.

Mayfield became Charlotte’s first openly gay or lesbian elected official in 2011. Both Leake and Cogdell have past endorsements from a local LGBT rights group, the Mecklenburg LGBT Political Action Committee, or MeckPAC. That group has endorsed Leake in this fall’s election for county commission seats. They have yet to issue a statement regarding the Farrakhan controversy and whether any of their endorsements might be rescinded.

Facebook screen capture

Screen capture image current as of Friday, Oct. 19, 2012, 10:12 p.m. Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge

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Posted by Matt Comer

Matt Comer is a staff writer for QNotes. He previously served as editor from October 2007 through August 2015.

3 Replies to “Mayfield accuses fellow gay leader of intolerance”

  1. I thought of LaWana as a principled leader who understands how religion-based bigotry harms youth, especially LGBT youth who are homeless or suicidal because of supposed religious leaders like Farrakahn and his hate group (which is defined as such by the Southern Poverty Law Center) preaching hateful rhetoric in the name of God.

    Instead of saying she condemns Farrakahn and his group’s actions, she is on record saying that he is “doing God’s will.” I thought this was in error so I posted my comment on her site initially. Then I only got her condemning me for “intolerance.”

    For the record, I never asked LaWana to remove any post on her page. I was seeking to understand why she was on record saying Farrakahn was “doing God’s will.” Also my husband and I have donated to LaWana’s campaign and we have shown support for LaWana in countless ways over the years.

    I am disappointed in LaWana as an elected leader and her inability to condemn a man who is the founder/leader of a hate group and is on record ascribing violence toward Jewish and LGBT communities. Our community needs leadership not pandering principles that would support, not condemn leaders like Farrakahn. Will she say Fred Phelps, Tony Perkins, Pat Robertson (etc) are “doing God’s will” when they act to harm, hurt and defame a group of people in the name of God?

    All LaWana had to say is what Mayor Foxx is on record saying: “I condemn hate in any form.”

  2. It’s pitiful to watch the internalized homophobia of LaWana Mayfield continue to play out on the public stage.

    Already this year, she tried to avoid taking a stand against Amendment One by presenting a false accounting of the duties of her office.

    Now this.

    The community — LGBT and otherwise — deserves better.

    I’d take a straight ally with a backbone over an LGBT jellyfish any day of the week.

    It’s so disappointing that Mayfield is providing a case study in political homophobia.

    1. This. Yes.

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