The Charlotte Observer and The News & Observer in Raleigh today instituted their new digital subscription plans. (Note from Charlotte publisher here, note from Raleigh publisher here.) The State in Columbia previously launched their pay wall on Dec. 4 (their editor’s note here).

The online pay walls give readers unlimited access to the newspaper websites’ home pages and other sections like local news, sports, business and entertainment, as well as obituaries, real estate listings and other advertising sections. After a reader views 15 individual articles or other pieces of content, however, they will be asked to subscribe to the digital edition.

The new plans are dubbed “Charlotte Observer Plus,” “The N&O Plus” and “The State Plus.” The plans include access to the newspapers’ websites and smartphone and tablet editions.

All three newspapers are owned by McClatchy. The company has said they will institute pay walls on all of their online properties. The company also owns several other smaller Carolinas papers, including The Herald in Rock Hill, The Sun in Myrtle Beach, The Beaufort (S.C.) Gazette and The Island Packet in Hilton Head.

The newspapers have differing subscription plans and rates. The information is reprinted from both newspapers below.

The Charlotte Observer (FAQ page):

Q. What are my digital subscription options?

A. There are several options. Charlotte Observer newspaper subscribers can add the digital bundle with unlimited digital access for an additional 67 cents a week for seven day subscribers; or 45 cents a week for Sunday only subscribers. This is the best deal for digital access.

Without a digital subscription, you will have unlimited access to some portions of our site, including the Home Page, section fronts (such as Business, Sports and Entertainment), obituaries, dealsaver, Cars.com, real estate listings and other advertising areas. Access to some other content will be limited to 15 pages every 30 days. Once you reach the 15-page limit, you’ll need to subscribe or wait 30 days to view additional content. Mobile devices have a different limit.

If you want digital-only access, without a print subscription, the digital bundle alone is $9.95 per month (or $99.95 per year if paid annually).

For occasional readers, a one-month trial is available for 99 cents.

The News & Observer (FAQ page):

Q What are digital subscription options for subscribers?

A There are several. News & Observer newspaper subscribers can add the digital bundle to their newspaper subscription for an additional $2.46 every four weeks (or $32.00 per year for those who pay their subscription annually). Whether their newspaper subscription is 7-days, 6-days, weekends or Sunday only, they have access to our digital products 24/7. Adding the digital bundle to your newspaper subscription is our best deal.

To sign in or subscribe go to www.newsobserver.com/plus

For readers who do not have a News & Observer newspaper subscription and want only digital access, they can purchase the digital bundle alone for $0.99 for the first month. The subscription will automatically renew at $6.95 per month. They can also purchase the digital bundle for $69.95 per year if paid annually.

To sign in or subscribe go to www.newsobserver.com/plus

For those occasional readers from around the world who need access to our website for just a day, a 1-day pass is available for $0.99.

The State (FAQ page):

Q. What are my digital subscription options?

A. There are several. The State newspaper subscribers can add the digital bundle to their newspaper subscription for an additional $2.77 per month, less than 10 cents a day. Whether their newspaper subscription is seven days, five days, weekends, or some other frequency, they have access to our digital products 24/7. Adding the digital bundle to your newspaper subscription is our best deal.

For readers who do not have a newspaper subscription to The State and want only digital access, they can purchase the digital bundle alone for $8.95 per month or an annual rate of $99.

For those occasional readers from around the world who need access to our website for just a day, a one-day pass is available for 99 cents.

Matt Comer

Matt Comer previously served as editor from October 2007 through August 2015 and as a staff writer afterward in 2016.