Only 25 percent of NC voters for state overriding Charlotte LGBT anti-discrimination ordinance

The North Carolina General Assembly announced on Monday that today they will convene a special session to address Charlotte, N.C.’s expanded non-discrimination ordinance , which offers protections to the LGBT community. House Speaker Tim Moore announced that he had received the three-fifths support for such a session from both the House and Senate.

It appears as if the general population of North Carolina feels differently than their elected leaders on this issue, according to a recent poll by Raleigh based Public Policy Polling.

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Only 25 percent of North Carolina voters are in favor of the state overriding the city’s LGBT non-discrimination ordinance. 51 percent of voters think the city should be allowed to pass its own laws without interference from the state.

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The majority Democrats (58/17), Independents (48/21) and Republicans (45/38) alike all agree that the state should leave the ordinance alone.

The bill the GA will try to pass, entitled “An Act to Provide for Single Sex Multiple Occupancy Bathroom and Changing Facilities in Schools and Public Agencies and to Create Statewide Consistency in Regulation of Employment and Public Accommodations,” will also attempt to prohibit local governments from passing their own minimum wage and will also declare that the regulation of discriminatory practices in employment is an issue of statewide concern and, as such, must be left to the General Assembly.

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Posted by Jeff Taylor / Social Media Editor

Jeff Taylor is a journalist and artist. In addition to QNotes, his work has appeared in publications such The Charlotte Observer, Creative Loafing Charlotte, Inside Lacrosse, and McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. He graduated from the State University of New York at Brockport and has lived in Charlotte since 2006.@jefftaylorhuman.