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President Barack Obama – QNotes

Stonewall at 50

Jesse’s Journal

Fifty years ago, I was a 16-year old high school student in Miami; and I did not learn about Stonewall until I read my first gay newspaper two years later. Today, almost every high school student in America knows about Stonewall. What was once unmentionable is now part of our country’s political and social history.

Our People: Ames Simmons

Policy Director, Equality North Carolina

Ames Simmons is a queer, transgender white man who serves as the first-ever director of Trans Policy at Equality North Carolina, a statewide LGBTQ advocacy organization.

Hate crimes victim to be interred

Beyond the Carolinas

Matthew Shepard, a young man who was tied to a fence, beaten and tortured in 1998 in a field near Laramie, Wyo. will have his cremains interred in the National Cathedral in Washington on Oct. 26.

Charlotte shelters welcoming to LGBTQ people, but concerns linger nationwide with new administration

HUD policies have been updated to protect LGBTQ people, but will it last?

Homelessness among the LGBTQ population, in particular youth, is an epidemic that has long been battled by advocacy groups. While finding permanent housing is the ultimate goal, temporary housing in shelters is another method by which individuals are taken off the streets.

He’s been our president

Reflections on President Barack Obama

Too cerebral. Unwilling to engage in bare-knuckles political war with his Republican enemies. Naïve, in fact, about his ability to find common ground with a GOP determined to undermine, even delegitimize him from Day 1.

Out hoops star stumps for Clinton

Jason Collins has a long-term relationship with Hillary Clinton and the family

On Oct. 11-12, Jason Collins, the first openly gay NBA player, visited the Tar Heel State to campaign for his long-time friend and presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Jesse’s Journal: Stonewall National Monument

A look at LGBT history

The United States has 122 federally-protected areas called national monuments. The Antiquities Act of 1906 authorizes the president to proclaim “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest” as national monuments.