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National Gay History Project – QNotes

SF trans cultural district slowly moves forward

LGBT History Month: Designations highlight diversity, lived experience

It’s been a little over a year since San Francisco designated the nation’s first transgender cultural district in the city’s Tenderloin neighborhood.

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The Emma Jones Society Convention

LGBT History Month: Florida’s panhandle once hosted the largest LGBT gathering in the country

Emma Jones was one of the greatest LGBT allies in the 1960s in northern Florida. Too bad she didn’t actually exist.

50 years on, busting the myths of Stonewall

LGBT History Month: Looking at the LGBT Revolution

Each of us who were at Stonewall has a different view of the event. They run the gamut from it being a rebellion, a riot, a revolution, or simply a night of the queens having fun and taking over their home, Christopher Street.

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Tea with no shade

LGBT History Month: Tea Dance Revival

A gloomy, rainy Sunday in September couldn’t stop what was originally planned as an outdoor tea dance among the trees and fountains of Washington Park in Cincinnati.

An unlikely advocate for gay rights emerges

LGBT History Month: America’s First Equality Governor

In April of 1975, a groundbreaking event occurred in the fight for gay and lesbian equal rights. In Pennsylvania, a state not generally known for liberal politics, a courageous and progressive governor, Milton J. Shapp, signed an executive order that banned discrimination in state government.

Lesbian Erasure: Part Two

LGBT History Month: Stepping away from the norm, Susan B. Anthony and others make their mark on society

Examples of lesbian sexuality are all over early American history. The 19th century saw a myriad of reasons why lesbianism was actually embraced, right up until the turn of the 20th century, when it wasn’t.

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Lesbian Erasure: Part One

LGBT History Month: Defining Lesbianism

By Victoria A. Brownworth (Author’s Note: For the purposes of space, except for brief references, this article focuses on lesbian couplings in the U.S.) Lesbians exist. Lesbians, like gay men, have always existed. If there is a singular lesson to be learned this LGBT history month, it is that lesbians didn’t just appear suddenly in …

30 LGBT publications challenge historians to get LGBT history ‘straight’

QNotes participates in nationwide LGBT History Month series

In what is hailed as the largest gay history project of its kind in the nation, 30 U.S. publications serving lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and transgender people will celebrate October as Gay History Month by presenting the series, “We are America: How members of the LGBT community helped create the U.S.A.”

William Rufus King: First gay U.S. vice president?

National Gay History Project 2011

North Carolina’s William Rufus DeVane King, the 13th United States vice president, has the distinction of having served in that office for less time than any other vice president. He died of tuberculosis on April 18, 1853, just 25 days after being sworn into office on March 24, 1853. Other historians have speculated that King holds yet another distinction — the likely status of being the first gay U.S. vice president and possibly one of the first gay members of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.